Noble House (James Clavell)

Ignore the “New York Times Bestseller” blurb on the cover. That is like an Oscar. Very annoying and no guarantee of quality. (But this is a good novel, despite the New York Times endorsing it) It’s rare for a book of this size to maintain its pace, but this one manages it. A great business novel with a large cast of larger than life characters from governors to coolies in the cauldron that is Hong Kong. The plot twists and turns with many unexpected turns and stories within stories. The characters themselves are far removed from anyone I have ever met and operate in a moral framework that is utterly alien. Yet one can’t help but sympathize with them as every one of them goes about achieving their own aims with ruthless rationality. [Read more…]

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Calvin & Hobbes (Bill Watterson)

(I’m not reviewing a particular C & H book, as there’s so many. I recommend the Complete Collection. Unfortunately, some may need to mortgage their grandmother to afford that) It is amazing that comics can be so rich in content. We all know that the world is ‘unfair’, but Calvin and Hobbes makes it more evident than anyone else. As social critiques they may be rated on a par with many ‘serious’ writers. Calvin is a whiny, uncooperative 6-year-old kid who thinks the whole world revolves around him. The boy has a lot of imagination too, and he often uses them as a metaphor in real life, but he thinks that it really happened. Hobbes is the only one who believes him, but he’s a stuffed tiger, so he can make him believe everything. [Read more…]

The Forbidden Territory (Dennis Wheatley)

This was a smash hit in 1933 for its first time author. And he never looked back. By the 1960s he was selling a million books a year. He was never ‘big’ in America though, and with his elitist views and prudish characters, Wheatley’s name has faded into near obscurity now. As well as being well written from a technical perspective—plot, story, dialogue, exposition, The Forbidden Territory is also an interesting window on the late British Empire. For this reason, if no other, the books of Dennis Wheatley are worth reading. If you have a warm fire and a comfortable reading chair, this slim novel should provide a top-hole evening of very British entertainment: wealthy debonair characters (resolutely heterosexual) tanning the hide of uppity foreigners. It almost makes one wish for the return of the British Empire. [Read more…]

The Rainbow Nation

Lame stream media fake news outlets like the Bolshevik Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and the Clinton News Network (CNN) have repeatedly told us that South Africa became ‘free’ in 1994 when the ANC took power. But for people who live in the real world lets hear from someone who actually has to live behind the barbed wire paradise of this multi-cultural enrichment of perversity. Or is that ‘die-versity’? Like ‘racism’, another term that cannot be dragged through any more mud. Monica Stone is not a politically correct speaker but she speaks the truth. I applaud Radio 3 Fourteen for allowing an alternative view to be heard.

Into The Cannibal’s Pot (Ilana Mercer)

If you are a typical brainwashed liberal don’t read this. Because your CNN/Hollywood/To Kill A Mockingbird/Kumbaya view of the world will be shaken and severely stirred. This book reveals what happens when an advanced nation built by European people, upon Christian principles, is deceived by the Cultural Marxist dream of racial egalitarianism. And in the name of “justice” and “liberty” surrenders political power to an African majority that has never shown the capacity to create or sustain a free, just, and civilized society. [Read more…]

House Of Cards (1990 – 1995 United Kingdom)

house-of-cards-500x271This is almost 11 hours (4 DVD’s) worth of top quality entertainment. The viewer’s life grinds to a halt to digest each segment. This is the kind of drama that makes the BBC world-famous. Nothing can beat it. The Americans wish they could create modern Shakespearean tragedies like this, but they lack the breeding and pedigree of an old world country. So is it worth buying, renting, borrowing or stealing? To quote the Right Honourable Francis Urquhart MP, “you might very well think that but I couldn’t possibly comment!” [Read more…]

A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide & The Question Of Turkish Responsibility (Taner Akam)

bookTaner Akcam is very brave for speaking up for the Armenians, who suffered the first genocide of the 20th century. Unfortunately, there is an ever-growing movement by the Turkish government to cover this up, and they are paying countless individuals to go online and spread lies. Akcam continues to be the boldest Turkish intellectual alive, and his reviews seem to reflect that. He has suffered numerous death threats and various Turkish nationalist fantasies about his having been a “terrorist” before he became a scholar.
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The Thin Man (Dashiell Hammett)

bookThis book actually is worth reading a couple of times. Read it the first time for fun, but then reread it to see what you missed seeing the first time around. A former private eye has given up on the detective work after his wife has inherited her father’s businesses, and is running her financial affairs for her. On vacation, they run into his former acquaintances and, of course, a mystery develops which he reluctantly is persuaded to investigate. [Read more…]

Ricky Gervais Live: Politics

Politics Ricky GervaisOne of his four stand up shows that have sold truckloads of dvds. From a London stage Ricky Gervais covers all sorts of topics with a vague connection to politics and daily life. The connections are perhaps a little thin, but Gervais certainly says the stuff that the rest of us are either too scared to say, or just have the decency not to even think of saying. [Read more…]

Cat Girl (1957 United Kingdom)

033(Happiness is a warm…)

A blogger’s work is never done.  I’ve wiped the flour off my apron and lifted up my under-frock to let you have a perv at my new baby. Please read on while I go into post- review depression. On July 20 1957 British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan uttered these words: “Let’s be frank about it, some of our people have never had it so good.” By the time I was born a decade later the good was running out fast and my family emigrated to the colonies. But it must have been nice to be a teenager in the 50s and 60s. [Read more…]

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