Countess Dracula (1971 United Kingdom)

Despite its misleading title, this is a rendition of the exploits of Elisabeth Bathory–a Hungarian noble woman who killed around 650 girls in the 16th century. She believed bathing in their blood would restore her youth. The film’s feel of Hungary circa that time is convincing throughout, perhaps because director Peter Sasdy, producer Alexander Paal and romantic lead Sandor Eles were all native Hungarians. In a role at one time earmarked for Diana Rigg, Ingrid Pitt is frostily sinister as the elderly Countess and fulsomely passionate as the younger one, despite Hammer Studios re-dubbing her dialogue by another actress.  [Read more…]

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The Vampire Lovers (1970 UK)

Ingrid Pitt 1970 (2)In Australia this movie ran continuously for at least 5 years at the same theatre, so popular was this Hammer classic. The Vampire Lovers is a classic tale of good versus evil, the way vampire films should be, with the vampire as a soulless and selfish creature with no humanity left in it. The modern idea of the suffering humanistic vampire decrying the pain of immortality is somewhat embarrassing. Another ridiculously overused modern device is vampirism as an infectious disease. We’ll have none of that here! [Read more…]

Where Eagles Dare (1968 Britain)

500px-Where_eagles_dare4This is typical Alistair MacLean, with all the plot twists and set ups that are completely unbelievable, but if you are not expecting anything more it is one of the most enjoyable action flicks of that era. The Ron Goodwin score, very Shostakovitch in tone, is one of the most exhilarating while the sullen dark cinematography adds the atmosphere. [Read more…]

THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD (1970 UK)

peter cushing house that dripped 2 Tracking down a missing film star, an inspector finds that the last reported sighting was in a large mansion in the countryside. During the course of looking through the house, he is told four different stories about past residents of the house. [Read more…]

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