From Beyond The Grave (1974 Britain)

A four part story film with more resonance than its predecessors. The success of this Amicus portmanteau is the unusually strong and well-integrated story, with a Yorkshire – voiced Peter Cushing enjoying himself as the sinister proprietor of ‘Temptations Antiques.’ Situated between a cemetery and a nearby demolition contractor this is a most curious of curiosity shops. Cushing’s duffel coat and cloth cap appearance seems like just another part of the shop’s antiquated décor. But mind how you treat him if you want to buy some of his object d art. Even the one honest customer who goes in has to endure a highly unpleasant experience! [Read more…]

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The Sorcerers (1967 United Kingdom)

 

Boris Karloff is masterful, even if he has to spend half of this film sitting helplessly on the floor. The late Michael Reeves certainly knew how to make the viewer feel uncomfortable. This is even more upsetting than his later Witchfinder General. It’s a fascinating, yet very sad, snapshot of urban British working class life in 1967. It’s amazing how things seemed more unclean then, how depressingly dirty and squalid the back streets of “swinging London” could really be like. Everything about The Sorcerers is grubby. While the dvd is playing I feel like I’m there. In The Glory Hole. (Don’t laugh – you’ll need to see this movie to know I’m not being rude. The GH is an integral part of the plot) It’s all very mentally disconcerting. [Read more…]

And Now The Screaming Starts (1973 Britain)

This period horror film has all the right ingredients to be a success. It’s got atmosphere, nice sets, Peter Cushing, an experienced horror director, a severed hand with a mind of it’s own…but despite all this, it just doesn’t work as it should. One of the studio’s rare non-anthology movies, it suffers from a very uncertain script. The opening narration suggests a gothic melodrama along the lines of `Rebecca’, but it all-too quickly goes over the top. Familiar genre faces such as Patrick Magee pop up only to fall foul for a disembodied hand (a left over from the studio’s `Dr Terror’s House Of Horrors’) and the whole thing falters. [Read more…]

No Sex Please, We’re British (1973 UK)

No SPWBThere was an era when British stage comedy was at it’s zenith with plays that became known as Whitehall Farces. So named because they were always staged at the Whitehall theatre, and produced by Brian Rix. Many were later filmed and enjoyed success on the big screen and “No Sex Please” is one of them. Ideal light entertainment if you are stuck in a hotel in North Wales on a very wet weekend. No foul language, no extreme violence, no Americans!  [Read more…]

WUTHERING HEIGHTS (1970 United Kingdom)

1970titlesOne of literature’s greatest love stories and this is the best adaptation I’ve seen so far. A tale of tormented lovers who are destined to be together until the end of time and beyond. “When I’m dead, I think I’ll come haunt you as the sunset. ” – Catherine [Read more…]

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