Night Gallery (1969–1973 USA)

night-gallery-season-2-billboard-rod-serling-600x300After “Twilight Zone” was canceled Rod Serling’s “The Night Gallery” appeared some years later. It was hosted by Rod Serling himself, a bit older than he looked when he hosted “Twilight Zone” as he walked us through an art gallery replete with strange, demonic, often very intimidating artwork. Each work of art told a story which was the focus of each half-hour episode. The series did very well and it was a more intense follow-up to “Twilight Zone”, which suffered from a rather static and preachy talkiness and far more censorship. Because it was the early 70’s, the episodes of Night Gallery were a tad more uncensored and graphic. [Read more…]


Rosemary’s Baby (1968 USA)

This post is dedicated to those who were slaughtered (Sharon Tate & John Lennon) or raped (Samantha Geimer) so Roman Polanski could enjoy a successful movie career, untold wealth and women to satisfy his carnal lusts. The devil certainly looks after his own…

RB was a real landmark that helped keep the genre alive by pushing the occult (something fairly taboo back then, and not fully explored in cinema since the days of the silents) to the fore. Also, the restrained atmospheric horror was extremely influential. It inspired many, but has rarely been bettered. Not as scary as The Exorcist, which is more sick and nasty but Rosemary’s Baby is superior in its intricate plotting, which drives the icicles up the viewer’s spine in a fit of paranoia. Its almost as if an innocent Catholic girl became victim of the real Illuminati. And she has. Oppressive control by shady forces seems all too real in our world. This gives Rosemary’s Baby an authenticity lacking in the usual horror/fantasy genre. [Read more…]

The Mask Of Cthulu (August Derleth)

One thing you can say about this August Derleth fellow is that he enjoys the frequent use of the word ‘conterminous’; and for that, I found his work rather endearing! ‘The Mask of Cthulhu’ is probably best enjoyed in small doses, since reading the whole collection in one voluminous bite reveals a distinct lack of variety in each fiendish tale of slumberous batrachian maleficence. These eldritch narratives, while stolid and well-written, do lack invention, and a modicum of dry wit would have added much to the murky proceedings. [Read more…]

Dementia 13 (USA/Ireland 1963)

Public domain titles from the golden age of schlock, like Dementia 13, tend to live an unloved life in the bargain bins of any self-respecting dvd store. Price will vary from fifty cents up to maybe five bucks if the merchant is feeling lucky. Why this has such a I’m cheap buy me status is baffling to a lover of old schlock like me. This film owes much of its terror from its setting, its imagery and surreal circumstances that have a hint of something otherworldly. [Read more…]

Tales Of Terror (1962 USA)

The fourth venture into Poe adaptations for Roger Corman and Vincent Price sees them taking on the portmanteau format with a trilogy of creepers.  Somewhat a turning point in the series. Tales of Terror implements a wicked sense of humour for the first time that’ll become more and more a trademark in the later movies. It is usually very difficult to try to adapt Poe stories to film–similar to the difficulty of attempting to adapt H.P. Lovecraft to film. Both authors write very dense, poetic, often abstract prose, and Poe, especially, is sometimes not very plot-oriented. Although each segment in Tales of Terror succeeds in its own way. [Read more…]

Halloween (1978 USA)

He’s gone! The evil has gone!” Bug eyed Dr Loomis (Donald Pleasence) screams. This hilarious line stands out from such a bare bones of a screenplay. John Carpenter’s direction makes a lot out of such simple elements as: shadows, dark streets, creaking doors, that it makes even the everyday setting of a small town neighborhood claustrophobically terrifying. Of course, back when this was made there were no smart phones or CCTV to combat predatory homicidal stalkers. Although it wasn’t the first of its kind, Halloween certainly was the game-changer for almost every other slasher flick that followed this low-budget indie horror. But they only ended up imitating the formula that this sick ‘classic’ originated. [Read more…]

Monella (1998 Italy)

The uncut and uncensored Italian version of Frivolous Lola (if you prefer it in English) was another classic Tinto Brass soft-core erotic comedic-drama that possessed a light-heartedness that only Brass can achieve so effortlessly. Grubby and tedious as this all is, there is a certain panache in the way it has been constructed. It looks beautiful, like the scenes set in Sicily in The Godfather, it has that same woozy, sultry sensibility. A veneer of quality that the film may not deserve, like a Caravaggio painting with a cock crudely drawn on it. If the best scene in a film is a woman urinating in the rain, should it be considered a failure? Not really. NSFW… [Read more…]

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969 United Kingdom)

Following a long period of cheap-looking productions designed to play as double-features on their home turf, Hammer returned to premium quality with Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed. This is Peter Cushing’s definitive portrayal of the Baron. For once a Hammer Frankenstein doesn’t need an actual monster, but lets the baron himself become “more monstrous than the monsters he created”, as the advertisements proclaimed. And for a horror film, you’d have to agree that the locations used for filming were really quite elegant and ornate. The Spengler boarding house and Brandt’s home were exquisitely appointed and furnished, and all the while I kept thinking that they would have been a pretty nice place to live.  [Read more…]

Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1956 USA)

The Thing From Another World birthed the alien invader film, and the theme proved so popular it quickly became its own genre. Where most of these, especially The War of the Worlds, showed aliens arriving en masse in gigantic spaceships to obliterate humanity from the face of the Earth. The Thing From Another World and its ilk took the same basic idea and ran with it to more invasive places. And Invasion of the Body Snatchers is the finest example. At the time it was made, it was the most terrifying alien invader film to emerge. There are other worthy examples but few have unsettled audiences like this dark and eerie work. [Read more…]

Short Stories of Ambrose Bierce Vol 1 (read by Charlton Griffin)

Named after a hanged felon, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce (1842–1914?) fittingly turned his literary gift to the macabre. In this he became the successor to Poe, adding to the master’s repertoire a distinctly American style of Gothic, and the horror he witnessed on the battlefields of the American Civil War. Charlton Griffin reads eight of his chillers here, including his masterpiece, “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” His other classic, “The Moonlit Road” is part of this collection too. In a resonant and well-modulated baritone Griffin employs a curious detachment; although he skillfully negotiates some difficult locutions, he undercuts suspense and ignores a tale’s trajectory. This is not really a criticism – Bierce’s tales are sparse and uniquely solitary, living by the maxim: less is more. He packed so much power into so few words. A smattering of creepy music and sound effects that conjure up being lost in a forest, rounds out this audio performance, although it gilds the lily rather than adds anything of real meaning. I do recommend this as a worthwhile audio book.

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