Countess Dracula (1971 United Kingdom)

Despite its misleading title, this is a rendition of the exploits of Elisabeth Bathory–a Hungarian noble woman who killed around 650 girls in the 16th century. She believed bathing in their blood would restore her youth. The film’s feel of Hungary circa that time is convincing throughout, perhaps because director Peter Sasdy, producer Alexander Paal and romantic lead Sandor Eles were all native Hungarians. In a role at one time earmarked for Diana Rigg, Ingrid Pitt is frostily sinister as the elderly Countess and fulsomely passionate as the younger one, despite Hammer Studios re-dubbing her dialogue by another actress.  [Read more…]

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A Man For All Seasons (1966 Britain)

This piece of classic cinema is an erudite example of the old Biblical maxim: a man cannot serve two masters. Sir Thomas More, a multi-talented man of letters and law, went to the executioner’s block because he would not recognize a temporal king as head of his country’s church. Though a friend of Henry VIII, and his chancellor, he was more afraid of offending God than the king. A man who took his Catholic faith quite seriously. Robert Bolt’s play ran for 637 performances in the 1961-1963 season on Broadway and the only two who came over from the Broadway cast were Paul Scofield as More and Leo McKern as Thomas Cromwell. [Read more…]

The Thirteenth Tale (Diane Setterfield)

A gothic suspense novel with echoes from several Victorian novels. The familiar device of a “story within a story” is employed, and sometimes it even contains another story. This story-telling tradition strongly reminds the reader of earlier classic tales. In fact the “rule of threes” goes throughout this book echoing its fairytale feel. There is the structure of the book itself, “Beginnings, Middles and Endings”. There are three generations in the earlier saga. This is the author’s first novel, and promises well if she stops being so rooted in the gothic canon and makes a bold leap into the unknown and the supernatural she is clearly so drawn to.   [Read more…]

Into The Cannibal’s Pot (Ilana Mercer)

If you are a typical brainwashed liberal don’t read this. Because your CNN/Hollywood/To Kill A Mockingbird/Kumbaya view of the world will be shaken and severely stirred. This book reveals what happens when an advanced nation built by European people, upon Christian principles, is deceived by the Cultural Marxist dream of racial egalitarianism. And in the name of “justice” and “liberty” surrenders political power to an African majority that has never shown the capacity to create or sustain a free, just, and civilized society. [Read more…]

The Lonesome Gods (Louis L’Amour)

1983thelonesomegodspb1984Quintessential “guy-lit” (or whatever is the opposite of “chick-lit”). This is a long book for L’Amour. He spends some time getting philosophical – a boy on his own living in the desert, communing with nature, learning and such.  This is a book about being a man. And becoming a man. All those things a man gotta do. The main theme is Self Reliance. There are also some great descriptions of the California/Arizona desert around the time of the Gold Rush. [Read more…]

The Creature From Jekyll Island (G Edward Griffin)

attaque-fed-jim-sinclairThe crime of not only the century but the millenium was perpetrated in 1913 when the Federal Reserve system was created and it has been performing a constant rape of the United States ever since. It has even grown to take over the entire world’s money supply. You will be astonished to read the way it was done and the bitter, vile consequences of this ghastly creation. Again, do not read this book if you want to continue the illusion that you are free. [Read more…]

Meditations (Marcus Aurelius)

marcus aurelius meditations“…because most of what we say and do is not essential. If you can eliminate it, you’ll have more time and more tranquillity. Ask yourself at every moment, is this necessary…” Approximately 1,900 years after this was first published, I wonder how the author would feel to know his collection of thoughts are currently at number 2 on the Amazon best seller list for the category Society/History/Philosophy. It would certainly be something for him to ponder. [Read more…]

The Mummy (Anne Rice)

The_Mummy_coverRice started writing paranormal romance before it was in style. The Mummy has the perfect mix of tragedy, romance, history and emotion that she pulls off so well, without any extra flab added to the story. Compared to her other novels, The Mummy is incredibly short, with my version only being 398 pages. They fly by at the speed of sound. Maybe I’m a bit biased because I’ve always loved ancient Egypt and have been fascinated by Ramses the Great. [Read more…]

Krakatoa: The Day The World Ended: August 27, 1883 (Simon Winchester)

krakatoaOne of the great events in the history of the 19th century. It was exactly 10:02 a.m. on Monday, August 27, 1883 when the small volcanic island of Krakatoa in the Sunda Strait between Java and Sumatra blew itself out of existence with an explosion that was heard thousands of miles away and that resulted in the deaths of over 36,000 people. That eruption is believed to be the loudest sound ever heard by human ears. [Read more…]

Gettysburg (1993 USA)

GettysburgThere can’t be many better films ever made of the American Civil War, perhaps the best war movie of all time, and possibly one of the best films of all time. The story is historically accurate. Watching “Gettysburg”, you will know everything about the battle. Where the armies marched, who attacked, where the fighting took place etc. Facts are very precise. You will also find out how the chain of command works, from the highest general to the men fighting in the front row. Director Ronald F Maxwell really takes you there. [Read more…]

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