The Island At The Top Of The World (1974 USA)

A fun and forgettable family adventure film that passes the time amiably enough. There’s nothing here that’s controversial, just one old-fashioned adventure after another, and thankfully it’s not as twee as I’d feared given its Disney pedigree. This is one of the better-regarded of the Disney studio’s live-action efforts, particularly among those made following Walt’s death. It’s a fantasy adventure on Jules Verne lines; actually, the film coincided with the somewhat similar (and equally good) The Land That Time Forgot (1975). [Read more…]

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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe (2005)

The Chronicles of Narnia is a film that couldn’t have been made in the 20th century effectively – it relies so heavily on special effects and digital tricks that even attempting to make it without all the digital trickery would have resulted in a B-film, regardless of its budget. With his experience as the special effects guy on several of the Batman films, director and producer Andrew Adamson did manage to put together one hell of a display. With all the visual do-goodery in place, and one of the best stories ever told to drive it forward, there wasn’t a lot to make the Witch and the Wardrobe fail… And of course, it doesn’t. [Read more…]

Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey (1993 USA)

Homeward.bound_dvd_coverThis is a remake of the 1963 oldie ‘The Incredibly Journey’. Surprisingly, the plot is almost identical but this one is superior. The biggest difference is that this version is more for the big screen and has far more humour. Another big difference is that the animals talk here, which is good because they only talk by telepathy. If they moved their lips like people, or like animals do in cartoons, it would be too unreal so top marks for that. [Read more…]

The Jungle Book (1967 USA)

film 5The combination of cast, roles, and music never worked as well on any Disney film from the classic era as it did, here. The great voices of Disney feature films are all present, and they all define their characters in an unforgettable way. It gets by on charm, which it has a considerable supply of. Sebastian Cabot, Phil Harris, George Sanders, J. Pat O’Malley, Sterling Holloway, and especially Louis Prima make their animated avatars come to brilliant life in this film, well-adapted from Rudyard Kipling’s book. [Read more…]

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