The Killers (1964 USA)

Hugely influential classic re-telling of Ernest Hemingway’s short story. This flick has inspired many a wannabe. Not really Film Noir as it was made after the genre had passed and is in colour and features no detectives or private eyes. And not even a “film” as it was originally intended as the very first made-for-television movie. With this version also featuring a murder-by-sniper scene, the recent assassination of John F. Kennedy by sniper ensured The Killers was temporarily on unsafe ground. With Ronald Reagan making his last appearance on film before moving into politics, the ’64 version of The Killers has a bit of history. [Read more…]

Another Scary Song

Just when you thought it was safe to check out the next post. Kate hits the fear bone again. The longer album version is creepier because of a delayed reaction gong sound at the end.

Spine Chilling Kate

Maybe she was channeling a pure energy: ethereal, luminous, poetic, feminine, the eternal child, adolescent sexuality and more. She became the song, she was the dance. That voice is hair raising. From a 19 year old waif what an event! It still grabs my soul from the other side…

The Dunwich Horror (USA 1970)

I reviewed this on April 30, 2015. Now I’m doing it again. Before you steal a forbidden grimoire from a library and writhe nude on a Druid’s altar, hear me out. Why revamp an old post? Because its there! What I love about the Dunwich Horror is that its an overly long episode of Night Gallery. Lovecraft’s stories, with their references to tentacles and other undulating protuberances coming in and out of things at all angles, were certainly sexual – in a mad way – but they were never sexy. He would have hated this sexing up of his story but who cares? This is a unique work: where else will you see a feminist raped to death by a male chauvinist cabbage from an outré dimension? Exactly. Plus the ocean is used throughout as symbolic of timelessness and eternity, and Wilbur Whately’s Twin’s presence is made known by a combo of a heart beating audio clip and the sound of water slushing. Its quite groovy. [Read more…]

Thunderball (Ian Fleming)

The Bond originally conceived by the cinema was very much a creature of the 1960s. Yet the Bond of the books is a man of the 1950s. And like many men in the 1950s, eating an English breakfast 3 times daily and not only being unfit, but unable to even spell the word, seemed to be de rigueur: James is in poor shape it seems, 60 cigarettes a day (think of that in 2017….where would he even find a place to smoke that often!?) do not keep the doctor away. And he drinks like a fish. So M sends him away on a little vacation to recuperate…again. And, of course, each time James goes away to rest, someone tries to take him out. What a life huh? [Read more…]

The Veldt (read by Leonard Nimoy)

The Red Room (H. G. Wells)

The Day Of The Jackal (1973 Britain/France)

Oubliez le remake 1997 de la merde. En fait oublier que Bruce Willis existe même. This is a wonderful, organic piece of thriller-narrative film-making. Over 2 hours, mostly without music, no patronizing voice-over or script-embedded exposition. Consequently, those moments where we’re not entirely sure what’s happening act as moments of suspense, not so much twists as notches in the grain of the plot. What I like most about the film is its pace. The economy with which the director Fred Zinneman tells the story is stripped right down. He allows the story to breathe inside the viewer. What else do I like about it? No CGI – hurray! No botox – bravo! No Hollywood/PC multi-culturalism to make races with brown or yellow skin feel ‘included’ in a story which isn’t theirs – wonderful! No smarmy wisecracks either. [Read more…]

The Mind Parasites (Colin Wilson)

“The Mind Parasites” came about when Wilson criticized a bloke named H P Lovecraft in one of his works. August Derleth, Lovecraft’s posthumous publisher and apologist, made a challenge to Wilson – saying, essentially “If you think Lovecraft was such a lousy writer, why don’t you do better yourself?” Wilson relished the challenge and set out to do just that. This book is the result. In fact, it can’t really be regarded as part of the Lovecraftian cycle – it takes too many liberties with the canon for that – but in its own right it’s an amazing work. We are not the top of the food chain; we have an energy predator which is feeding off of us and also restructuring the world in its image — this is the new world order. [Read more…]

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