Philadelphia (1993 USA)

Andrew’s father: “We’re incredibly proud of you.” Andrew’s mother: “You get in there and you fight for your rights.” Andrew: “Gee, I love you guys.” This piece of Hollywood trash made limousine liberals feel good about themselves as they virtue signalled to each other from their seats without getting too close to the messy reality this tale should tell. They decided to wear a prophylactic instead of giving it to us au naturel.  And as for Tom Hanks playing a gay man (Andrew) well, he had no idea what he was doing. Denzel Washington should have been the homosexual. With his Freddie Mercury moustache, he certainly looks the part.  [Read more…]

BWAAAH!

Minder (1979–1994 United Kingdom)

Anyone who had a TV set in Britain, (or in one of the colonies like here in NZ with its Anglophile programming) in the 1980s will know Minder. A beloved series to many, a guilty pleasure to many more and a load of old codswallop to a few others. It is in fact the finest comedy drama that TV has produced. Period. Yep. The show ran like a backbone through British TV in the 80’s. To watch it now is nostalgic and in some ways quite cosy viewing, but there is so much more to it than that. Unlike phony Sly Stallone, at least Dennis Waterman had some real boxing experience in the ring. This helped fight scene authenticity. [Read more…]

The Brothers Karamazov (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

This is probably the greatest work of fiction a human could achieve. Dostoyevsky bares his soul in this novel. He doesn’t hide behind irony, which allows an author the ability to maintain distance and ambiguity. And perhaps it is irony that separates the great novels of the past from the many contemporary novels that lack equivalent passion, honesty, and heft. The themes Dostoyevsky tackles along the way are significant and weighty. One thing that can overwhelm the modern reader is the morality here. The energy of it so intense. [Read more…]

Death Wish 3 (1985 US/Israel/UK)

When seconds count the police are only minutes away. Or hours. Particularly if you live in Detroit or Johannesburg. I mean, why even bother with laws, why bother with a constitution and why bother with a po-lice force? They only get in the way. What you really need to keep the streets safe is a big gun…and lots of bullets…and maybe a machine gun…and perhaps a rocket launcher too. Maybe that would have kept those people safe in London the other day. Have you ever seen a multi-racial gang in real life? Me neither, but in this flick whites, blacks & hispanics are all working together to tear down the hard work of New York’s ‘old people’.  [Read more…]

The Queen Of Disco

Elvis (Albert Goldman)

Howdy Ma’am. Don’t you just wish ya coulda been a simple, hillbilly Southern boy who ate $100 worth of Popsicles in one night? Or an FBI informant who ended up wearing adult nappies (diapers) because of drug-induced incontinence? Or simply a racist red neck with an IQ of 70 who was ashamed of his penis (“Little Elvis“)? Recommended for anyone who wants to know the precise menu of Elvis’s Last Supper – simple but gut-wrenching. Goldman tap dances all over Elvis’ blue suede shoes. These 598 pages outraged Presley’s faithful fans (their creepy devotion is worthy of a book too) back in 1981. I didn’t want to tackle Goldman’s follow up book: Elvis, The Last 24 Hours in case the content became too lavatorial.
[Read more…]

The McClane Apocalypse: Book One (Kate Morris)

I shouldn’t like this book. It’s like post apocalyptic chick lit. But for some reason I enjoyed this light hearted read. Maybe it’s because it reminds me a little of Little a House on the Prairie. The story is a family holed up together after the world goes to hell as a result of nukes, tsunamis and earthquakes. This take on PA fiction us more regarding the relationships of the characters rather than the world they live in. However there is plenty of action, just not as much of the gore filled section I am used to. It’s good to see a post apocalyptic storyline that still breathes a bit of hope optimism and plain old human decency. [Read more…]

The Undisputed Truth (Mike Tyson with Larry Sloman)

Despite being a boxing fan I never believed the Tyson hype, and his army of fan boys seem more like groupies. Firstly, I want to point out a few facts about his career. Before he went to jail he ducked George Foreman. After prison he avoided David Tua, Riddick Bowe, Ray Mercer & Oliver McCall (all these guys had iron chins despite some lapses in technique) and even paid Lennox Lewis 4 million dollars to not fight. Yes, he fought Lewis 6 years later – predictably getting his ass handed to him – but my point is, when Tyson knew an opponent was of the dangerous strong-willed variety, he refused to fight them. ‘Iron’ Mike indeed.
[Read more…]

The Hit (1984 UK)

It’s hard to put my finger on just what it is, exactly, that makes this film so impressive. One can hardly point to substantial character development, because the characters (with one exception) never really become true flesh and blood to us. The director knew how to combine simple, pure elements–strong, bold colours, bright sunlight, stark images, and exactly the right sounds–in ways that seem to speak of things larger than themselves. So what is it? Certainly the locations and the music, the general ambiance, add a lot to The Hit. [Read more…]

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